Tuesday, 26 December 2017

Garrison Troops

It rained buckets in Wellington yesterday, so our traditional Boxing Day hike up a lump in the landscape was postponed. What I did instead, of course, was finish my Garrison infantry. Pictured below is the result.

The figures, which are nearly all from the 1972 Garrison French Napoleonic range, are:

FN 1: Old Guard Grenadier Officer, converted into a Line Officer, x 1;
FN 2: Old Guard Grenadier advancing, x 6;
FN 4: Line Officer, converted into an eagle-bearer, x 1;
FN 7: Line Fusilier advancing, x 9; and, for the Voltigeurs,
FN 9: Line Grenadier advancing, x 6.

The only non-Garrison figure is the drummer, who was converted from a Lamming FI/6: Imperial Guard Grenadier drummer.

Garrison 25mm French Napoleonic Line Infantry

Garrison 25mm French Napoleonic Line Infantry

Garrison 25mm French Napoleonic Line Infantry

Garrison 25mm French Napoleonic Line Infantry

Garrison 25mm French Napoleonic Line Infantry

Garrison 25mm French Napoleonic Line Infantry

The last shot shows the new battalion besides my Der Kriegspielers Swiss, with Soult as the proud Brigadier. I wasn't really sure how they were going to fit in with the rest of my French army when I started them, but I think I've just about got away with it.

Seeing them together like this suggests that another pre-Bardin line battalion is needed in order to give Soult his division.



There's a bit more artillery required first, however, and another battle to fight on New Year's Day.

Happy New Year everyone.

WM

20 comments :

  1. Very pretty, but will they fight? The paint job is definitely élite but will you award them an 'A'?
    Hopefully I get my painting table back today now Boxing Day has been and gone - while painting has been in abeyance I've been extracting Don Featherstone's 'Skirmish Wargaming' rules for the Peninsular War scenario for a club game in a few weeks time. Simplifying the tables and removing anything not used in this game to produce QPS and record sheets should speed it up a bit.

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  2. We shall find out in a few days time, Rob, when JC comes round to wreak his revenge. The French will all be B-Class, apart from the Guard, and will be outnumbered by the Prussian hordes. It should be interesting.....

    I had to seize my painting opportunity with this lot as the New Year looks as if it's going to be excessively busy.

    Best of luck with your rule drafting. I'm a great fan of simplicity!

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  3. They look superb, colorful and disciplined...great job!

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    1. Cheers, once again, Phil.
      Yes, they are rather..er.. well drilled, aren't they - not like those lovely but always slightly shambolic looking Hinton Hunts!

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  4. The pose of these figures en masse look formidable and will make your Prussians nervous.

    I am sure they will serve their Emperor eith honour.

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    1. Thank you, Mark. Their aptitude for striking terror into the hearts of the dastardly JCs and Dribergs of this world was precisely why I wanted them.

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  5. Replies
    1. Thank you, Jim. It's just beginner's stuff compared to your mighty accomplishments! All the very best, WM

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  6. A really beautiful unit...
    And so shiny... maybe the fresh varnish will be tough enough to fend off the Prussian bullets...

    All the best Aly

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    Replies
    1. I'm hoping the dazzle will spoil their aim, Aly.

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  7. Hmmmm. . . Painting soldiers? Or a hike in the rain? I'd say you made the right and proper choice. They look wonderful.

    Best Regards,

    Stokes

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    Replies
    1. The really lovely thing was that Wellington Girl and I were able to work on our projects together - she was testing out the new watercolours she was given for Christmas,

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  8. C'est magnifique!

    What is your technique for making the pin swords? I have a few that need replacing and thought that might be the ticket.

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    1. Cheers, David.

      The pin swords were very easy to do. I forged them on my rail anvil, which has a rather useful curved edge, but I think any hard surface would do. The pins were flattened and shaped by hitting them with a hammer and then bending, cutting with wire cutters and filing. They were attached to the figures by: cutting a slot into the sword hilts; applying superglue; slotting in the swords; and pressing the hilts back together with flat-jawed pliers.

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    2. I was wondering how you achieved the curve, but it sounds like you are able to bend the sword even after flattening the pin. I thought it might be necessary to bend first then flatten.

      Thanks,

      David

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    3. It was a bit of both, Dave. I was using stainless steel pins which were actually quite bendy and surprisingly easy to file.

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  9. Always a pleasure to view your work, beautiful units, look forward to seeing the results of the New Year battle.

    Paul

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  10. I'm going to have to revise my opinion on non-HH figures as those look superb!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Ian. They're such iconic vintage castings that I simply had to give them a go. I'm still in two minds about whether they really belong on the Hinton Spieler, however, which has been all about Hinton Hunts and their derivations up till now. They go into battle later today, so we'll see whether or not they were worth it!

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